Tag Archives: comics

Press Release Friday (from my press secretary )

“FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE”
April 21, 2017

Humor, Horror and Age Drive Tim Hamilton to Self-Publish Comics.

Children’s book author, New Yorker cartoonist and artist behind the Eisner nominated adaptation of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 is adding self-publishing to his busy schedule.

Tim Hamilton announces he will write and illustrate his own twenty four-page anthology comic titled, Rabbit Who Fights which will come out three times a year. The anthology will contain sci-fi horror inspired and informed by the current state of the world, along with humor in the form of Hamilton’s comic, Brother Sasquatch. Previously available only on-line, Brother Sasquatch’s, humor is also informed by the darker side of human nature. The book will also contain rejected New Yorker cartoons and a story called, Hospital Comics.

He will also digitally publish a monthly humorous adventure called, Red Ryder and the Big Bad Woods which will involve talking animals and the existential threat of senility and old age.

Hamilton is publishing this all through Patreon with the intent of getting his own creations into public view on his own terms. Most of these comics don’t fit easily into a marketable niche and Hamilton wanted them in print before he gets any older as self-publishing is a game for the young.

You can see previews and find out more about, Rabbit Who Fights and Red Ryder and the Big Bad Woods on Hamilton’s Patreon page at:  https://www.patreon.com/TimHamiltoncomics

Read more about Tim Hamilton at
http://hamilton-tim.pairsite.com/CUTBLEED/
https://www.instagram.com/t.j.hamilton/?hl=en
https://twitter.com/TmoneyHamilton

 

Tim Hamilton lives in Brooklyn, NY.
His clients include: The New Yorker,
The New York Times, Amazon Studios
Cicada Magazine,Dark Horse, Marvel,
DC Comics, Mad Magazine, Nickelodeon
Magazine, Dow Jones, Lifetime, ABC
Television, Holiday House, Fast Company
Magazine and PublicAffairs.

He adapted “Treasure Island”
into a graphic novel for Puffin Graphics,

In 2010 
he adapted Ray Bradbury’s
“Fahrenheit 451″ into a graphic novel for
Hill & Wang with Mr. Bradbury’s blessing.
The resulting book was nominated for an
Eisner award in the “Best Adaptation of
Another Work” category.

Post to Twitter

Rainy Friday in September

As the ten or twelve of you who read this know, I’m working on Brooklyn Blood with Paul Levitz for Dark Horse Presents. I’m just about done with the last chapters (Chapter 8 in stores now!) and am drawing a few other possible projects. Thus, the piece of art below. Where and when this appears in print is as of yet not set in any type of schedule. This is how I draw roughs, on a Cintiq (in photoshop) . It’s kind of like drawing roughs with a marker. Ultimately I will print this out in non-photo blue, ink it in the real world and then scan it back into the computer to be colored. Every time I say or type that, I realize it’s a bit insane. Yes, I doodled some color on there. Total waste of time at this stage.

anthology-page-03

 

Post to Twitter

“The Subway Memories” (And Brooklyn Blood preview)

Brooklyn Blood by Paul Levitz and myself moves forward another eight pages in Dark Horse Presents! On line, and below, is a preview of next month’s splash page. Have to say, I really enjoyed drawing the subway. I love-hate the subway like many in NYC, but mostly I love it. The dancing that is not allowed is always entertaining and only costs me some pocket change. The food that is not allowed…well that always smells bad for some reason and we all know the ads are boring since Dr. Zizmor retired. I have at least two friends who were ticketed for peeing in the subway and one, along with MANY others,  who got away with it. Once, an older woman lit up a big joint on the 1 train and smoked it like she owned the car. One night I witnessed a birthday celebrant vomit on a subway seat, and floor, and another seat. Watched a woman create a blowtorch out of her hair spray can and a lighter in the service of chasing away some kids who had been harassing her. Passed the Fonze, who was coming up out of the subway as I was going down. Saw the police and EMT workers bring a body up from the subway only to have the white sheet fall off as I walked by. That last one will haunt me forever, and that’s kind of what I ended up drawing in this latest chapter.

The time for words is over, though!  You can look at the preview of the art now. The one where I get to draw the subway.

bbpage sample

Post to Twitter

My Friday Post on a Cold Friday In February

This week’s Dark Horse Presents (Issue 19) features another chapter of Brooklyn Blood by Paul Levitz and myself along with other stories by a plethora of creators. Below is page one of Chapter three (sans copy).

Brooklynblood pt 3pg17

I also did a little reportage type drawings and thought this particular one was an interesting failure. If you can tell what it is then, that’s great. But over all, it went so far off the rail it’s embarrassing. And interesting.  And embarrassing…fail

 

Post to Twitter

Frightening Skull Island Friday

I’ve been busy with children’s books and New Yorker cartoons of late, so it’s surprising (to me at least) that there are two comic books out this month containing stories by me.

Next week will be part one of Brooklyn Blood, by Paul Levitz and myself in Dark Horse Presents. As you can see from the small preview below, it involves skulls. It also involves Brooklyn and some blood. And a cop. Look for it in DHP issue 17 with a cover by me. The cover with a skull. Brooklynblood prev

Also, out today, I think, is issue 25 of Michel Fiffe’s unstoppable comic, “Copra.” For this anniversary issue Fiffe asked a few people such as, Benjamin Marra, Chuck Forsman, Kat Roberts, Sloane Leong, Paul Maybury and myself to contribute. I did an 8 page story you can see a small preview of below. It involves a guy with his skull breaking open. Spoilers: There will be more skulls in the story. Copra prev-1

I was as first hesitant to touch fiffe’s creations, but it turned out to be a fun project and I hope I did good! I certainly don’t want to be the “Tales of the Gold Monkey” to fiffe’s “Raiders of The Lost Ark.” Skulls!

Post to Twitter

Friday Info-Process-tainment

As I can now talk about the Dark Horse Presents story called ‘Brooklyn Blood’ I’m working on with Paul Levitz, and I’m teaching a Summer Residency in sequential art at SVA this summer, I thought my Friday post could be about just a small teeny tiny bit of my process. Where the class I teach is mostly concerned with telling a story, making that story clear on the page, using panel layout to guide the eye, finding that story inside of you that haunts you and causes you a small bit of metal pain when you dig it up (yes we did that in my very first class), I thought I’d post something a little more basic here. How I draw a comic page! Or part of a page. Note that what you see below is just the bottom third of a page from the upcoming ‘Brooklyn Blood.’ We’ll skip the writing part as Paul did that.

Step A: After I read the script I draw several thumbnails with a black marker. I throw most of them away in disgust. You see here the thumbnail I settled on. Then I scan this winning thumbnail into the computer and place it in page template (the template being the correct proportions that it will be when printed).

Step B: I draw the rough pencils on a Cintiq (if you don’t know what a Cintiq is just hit the Googles). If you don’t have a Cintiq, many people use a light box to draw finished pencils on top of the blown up thumbnail which you can enlarge on a copy machine or computer.

Step C: Then I get back out of the computer by printing out a blue line version of the pencils on Bristol board. Blue line because I can now ink it in the real world with black ink, and when I scan it back into Photoshop, the blue line will not show up in the scan, only the black lines show up.

Step D: You can ink using a Cintiq also, but I still like using messy ink and brush or pen or wooden sticks. I personally like making marks on real paper. Too much work in the computer ends up putting me to sleep.

Step E: I scan the final black and white art back into the computer and on a separate layer from the black art in Photoshop, I add the colors! I also add the word balloons early on in the process because that does affect where the reader’s eye goes, but for this brief art example, I left that bit out! And there you have it. The exciting, amazing secrets of an illustrator! I just now see that I wrote “step A” in the text, and “Part A” on the art. That’s called a mistake. I make many of those! It’s part of the process. Brooklynblood proc 3

Post to Twitter

Experimental comics #1 (John Goes South)

To quote Marianne Moore, “I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle.” That’s how I feel many times about Experimental comics. But many times, experimental writing gets me out of the rut of creating and polishing “important” art and projects down to their perfect boring nubs. I have other reasons for looking into “experimenting” with sequential story telling, but for now, enough said.  The 2 page comic below was created by taking the first few words of the first paragraph of a random story in the Times for panel one, then the second and third words in the second paragraph of that story and so on. I then finish the sentence those words started so I can have a bit of an Exquisite Corpse all by myself. I never spend more than 10 minutes writing the whole thing. With this story, I pretty much drew what I wrote (with some embellishments). I’ve already created some new “constraints for my next one so the art will be more interesting. I will bore you with those details next week.  John goes south 1John goes south 2

Post to Twitter